Geolocation video guide

The video below guides you in the following ways …

  1. What extra data you get when geolocation is switched on.
  2. Examples of how to interpret those geolocated visitors.
  3. How to set up a template and automated reports showing your geolocated visitors.

The video runs to 15 minutes and will be useful if you want to gain some practical insights into how to interpret geolocated data, including what to watch out for, and how to set up templates and automated reports.

At the end of the video it refers to us being available to help so if you would like assistance with how to fully benefit from geolocation data, with us viewing your own data, please set up geolocation within your A1WebStats account (as shown further down this page) and then use this link to book in a call/screenshare for a date when you know you’ll have collected data from visitors who allowed themselves to be geolocated (normally 1-2 weeks after geolocation has been enabled): https://a1webstats.appointlet.com/s/a1webstats-familiarisation-call.

If you’re not yet at the point where you’re ready to set up geolocation and have general questions, please email us at hello@a1webstats.com.

After the video, the rest of this page provides basic insights into how to set up geolocation, including how it works.

 

How to get additional information about your website visitors

A1WebStats uses the IP address of the website visitor (and supporting data) to identify companies.  For example (page urls disguised for client confidentiality):

Normal company view

This is fine for much of the time but there will be scenarios where it’s more of a challenge.

As an example, many National Health Service (NHS) visitors are identified by a central IP which is far away from the actual visitor.  For example, while this appears to be someone from the NHS in Peterborough …

NHS not identified as local

It could be anywhere within the NHS nationwide, that uses that IP infrastructure.

For example, a doctor’s surgery.

The good news is that there is now an answer, and only A1WebStats can supply this functionality …

 

Unidentifiable IP addresses

There is also the challenge of those companies that can’t be easily identified by their IP address information.

Within A1WebStats you may see visitors that looked at important parts of your website (implying a good level of interest), but the standard IP information can’t identify who that visitor was.

Here’s an example of a non-identifiable visitor who was engaged with the website (page urls disguised for client confidentiality):

Geo IP No Postcode 1

It’s understandably frustrating for you to see good engagement with your website pages, but having no idea who the visitor was.  The ‘Location (from IP)’ data could be miles away from the actual location of the visitor.

Here’s a different visitor, who had good engagement with pages, but with Geolocation switched on within A1WebStats:

Geo ip postcode 1

The difference between the two is that the second visit (with geolocation switched on) picks up on the postcode and other address information of the visitor.

That enables you to look up that postcode to see if you can determine where the visit actually came from.

In the case of the example above, it was a visitor that would normally be very anonymous, but a search on Google makes it clear where they were from.

 

Switching on Geolocation in A1WebStats

There is a way round the challenge, but it has advantages and disadvantages (depending on your perspective) …

Note: you can only do this if you have a secure website, i.e. it starts with https.   This will apply to the majority of websites nowadays, as it’s good practice to have a secure site.

Within your A1WebStats account you can go to Options – Settings and can switch on the ‘Use geolocation on site?’ option, as shown below.

Geo location option on in A1WebStats

The downside (if you see it that way) to this is that visitors to your website will get a warning similar to this when they get to your website.  For example:

 

Browser wants to know your location

If they opt for ‘Allow’ then you will get a more accurate picture of their physical location – including postcode, and sometimes down to the precise address.

Here is an (otherwise unidentifiable as a company) example of a visit without geolocation switched on (it has ‘Location (from IP)’ in the black bar area):

 

Geo location switched off

 

Here is another visit with geolocation switched on within A1WebStats (the ‘Location (from IP)’ in the black bar area is replaced by a location):

Geo location switched on

With geolocation switched on, the data gave us not just the postcode but in this case the name of the location (OXO Tower).

You won’t always get the location name, but will always get the postcode/other identifier if the website visitor has allowed tracking of their location.

 

Choosing whether to use geolocation within A1WebStats

For some businesses, it’s an absolute NO to have this type of box appearing in the browser of the visitors:

Browser wants to know your location

Such a box could be perceived to be annoying the website visitors.

That’s a possible downside that has to be weighed up against the alternative:

Some people will click on Allow just to get the box removed.   Many people may think that’s a box they need to click on anyway, being familiar with having to accept other types of website page prompts (such as allowing cookies).

The obvious upside to using geolocation is that, for those who DO click on Allow, you will see the precise postcode location from where they visited.

We’ve been surprised at how many people DO allow themselves to be geolocated – perhaps because they are familiar clicking on such links within other websites that they’ve been to.

As at September 2019, the record for highest levels of geolocated data goes to one of our customers that had an acceptance rate that gave them 21% MORE data than they would have had without geolocation.   The rate of acceptance and use of geolocation data would vary depending on business sector but overall, it’s proving to be useful.

Our recommendation is to try it out for a period of time (two weeks would be a good time period), from two perspectives:

1. You can assess whether or not people have negative views about the box appearing.

2. You can use the extra data you receive to look up those postcodes and see how many link to identifiable businesses at those postcodes.

 

Accessing data showing geolocated visitors

A1WebStats has historically given you a view of two types of data:

1. Identifiable companies (visible within Filters – Organisations).

2. All visitors (visible within Filters – All Visitors) – these include organisations and geolocated data.

You can now view data showing just the geolocated visitors.

Using Advanced Filters (see from 12 minutes 11 seconds within the video further up this page) you can extract those visitors who were geolocated – either periodically, or set up as a template that  you could manually run whenever you want to.  You can also set that up to be run as an automated daily or weekly report.   You won’t see the geolocation information (e.g. postcode) in the automated report, but you will see the details when you click through and log into your A1WebStats account.

 

Here to help

As a reminder, if you have any questions about geolocation data, please email us at hello@a1webstats.com.

If you would like assistance with how to fully benefit from geolocation data, using your own data, please set up geolocation within your A1WebStats account (as shown further up this page) and then use this link to book in a call/screenshare for a date when you know you’ll have collected data from visitors who allowed themselves to be geolocated (normally 1-2 weeks after geolocation has been enabled): https://a1webstats.appointlet.com/s/a1webstats-familiarisation-call.