We had a midweek chuckle today when we saw this PR release focusing on how The Kipsen Company had partnered with Lead Forensics …

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The chuckle came when we looked up the contact details at the bottom …

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… and then went to the Kipsen website, which displays (10th September 2014) like this:

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Far from sending out a message of confidence in the respective businesses, it says:

  1. Whoever sent out the PR release had no idea about timing, nor checked that there was a live website to go to.
  2. Kipsen themselves have weak attention to detail, through not having their website ready to just switch over instead of having a holding page, and also through showing that September 1 date when they’ll be ‘back up’ and it being past that date (and no-one has updated that page).

What’s that got to do with website statistics?  Nothing at all, but there’s a clear lesson here:

If you do any form of PR activity, ensure that the people (your own, or those you employ) are fully competent (or that they care!).   And of course, to double-check yourself when anything is published about your own business.

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Comments

  1. This is the fourth article that I found with you berating some company for a misstep, is this really how you gain business? These are slime-ball tactics that just show the level of professionalism within your organization. A1WebStats seems like the kind of company that would make harmful PR for any prospective client that refuse their services. How about a greater focus on your services?

  2. Thanks for your feedback Roger. It’s worth putting this in context:

    The ‘misstep’ was related to a competitor, for who we see alerts when their name is mentioned. That release was actively (not accidentally) put out for PR. Logically, someone would check the fine details before allowing that to happen.

    We’re not in the business of picking holes in any prospective client (or anyone) – that would be daft. However, we are in the business of helping businesses to gain more from their websites by identifying pitfalls to avoid and opportunities to improve. That may sometimes include picking up on issues that should be of concern to businesses who want to a) get the best results from their website; b) get the best return from their budget.

    We would welcome you to look deeper (than just this one page) into our website as throughout it clearly shouts out a message of “we want businesses to succeed through identifying online weaknesses, and then fixing them”.

    If anything, we may have helped the company that we featured because if they were tracking who was talking about them, then they could have picked up on the problem sooner, rather than later.

  3. Your poor company @AndyHarris – I agree with @RogerMoore. A1WebStats is just picking on clients by throwing mud. I was considering using A1WebStats, but then a few things came up that I didn’t like and it seems like there are a lot of articles like this one, where you berate a company for something silly. I am not worried that you’ll do the same to me someday. The other thing is that you have a US address, but I can’t seem to find your registered company – maybe I over looked it.

    1. We are replying here purely to point out to readers of this blog, the lengths people will go to in order to ‘fight back’.

      The Roger Moore feedback was received on 18th April at 8:46am. That came from an IP address of 107.184.98.185.

      This Brooke Lampert feedback was received on 9th May at 8:37am. That also came from the same IP address of 107.184.98.185.

      That’s an amazing coincidence. What are the chances of two separate people, apparently unconnected, responding to the same blog from exactly the same IP address?!

      For the record though – our comments of April 19th still apply – we’re not in the habit of ‘picking on’ businesses but we do provide a service to those in business who want to get the best out of their websites and online communications and as part of that service we highlight pitfalls to avoid. Now we’ve just got one more to add – when getting feedback to your blogs, always dig deeper into the details, as you may uncover the sort of thing we have here.

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